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dyeing to be natural Decorating eggs and goodies for Easter doesn’t have to involve harmful chemicals B Y Lindsay Kastner P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y Allison Potter amanda evans starts planning for Easter weeks ahead of time by stockpiling papery onion skins, cit-rus peel, and bits of carrots. Evans wants her three children to have all the fun of coloring Easter eggs, just without the little dye tab-lets or bottles of liquid food color-ing that are commonly used. “My children are sensitive to food dye,” Evans explains. “You start notic-ing that, oh, when they have red food dye they start to go crazy.” So she turns to more natural methods, drawing pigment from food scraps, spice pow-ders, and even common weeds. “It is hard for kids when you are trying to avoid food dye, because the grocery store has it right there,” Evans says. Her 7-year-old son, Cole, dreams of opening a store with an entire aisle of candies that are free from commer-cial food dyes. For now, the family takes a DIY approach. The reasons why people turn to natural dyeing methods — whether for Easter eggs or for decorating cupcakes and other goodies — can vary. Many are skeptical about the safety of commercial food dyes, while for others it’s simply a fun experi-ment or a way to put otherwise discarded kitchen scraps to good use. Kari Grunow, a registered dietician at Wilmington Performance Lab, said commercial food dyes can be tough to avoid. 73 www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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