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sketches — line drawings really — of each and every new product introduced to buyers. “I get finish panels as well,” Aardema describes, “and from there I work with AutoCAD to create a floorplan of how the new products should be displayed. Then, I start looking at colors, including wall-paper, fabrics and area rugs, to bring the new collections to life.” As part of this process, she also chooses styles for upholstery, decorative accessories, lighting and art. Of course, in the complex world of showroom design, Aardema is also simultaneously orchestrating photography shoots of the sea-son just concluded, intimately involved with up to six shoots a day both on location and in the showroom, while collaborating with furniture designers, carpenters and painters for the next. When the new season’s opening day finally arrives, she returns to market once more in her role as a residential interior designer, scouting and shopping the new introductions in other showrooms and often partaking in the myriad of educational seminars on color trends and more offered to market attendees. While all this might sound thoroughly exhausting, Aardema has been thriving on her schedule for decades. “Interior design is a fascinating, continuously changing craft, and it’s rewarding to have the opportunity to enhance the way people live and work,” she says. “When the showroom is finished, I love to become my residential designer self again and shop with my cli-ents, because it keeps me current with what’s happening in people’s homes. When you’re doing showroom design, it’s all about mak-ing the furniture look comfortable; when you’re doing residential design, it’s only a success if the people look comfortable in it.” www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com 49 WBM


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