Page 18

2015-08

minimally invasive robotic Spine Surgery 18 WBM august 2015 Sinclair models the figures in her art from photographs of family members, including her children. “Both of my kids were competitive swimmers in Las Vegas, so for years, since they were little, I was taking them to the swim meets and the pools, and for maybe four hours every day, including Sundays, they were swimming. I was always looking at water patterns and splashes,” she says. “I was so fascinated by the shadows … the reflections.” In painting, her work is fluid. Movement is implied in compositions small and large — in a trio of square oils, loosely titled: “Almost There,” “Close,” “Drifting,” in which the swimmer is submerged — and in the swirl of water and flourish of bubbles seen in larger works like “Swim Around” and “Miss Flo.” In “Water Lily,” a swimmer’s face floats to the surface, hair tucked neatly under a white bathing cap. The place-ment of an arm suggests she’s mid backstroke, while her torso, sheathed in a red one piece, disappears and re-emerges. “I like the freedom. I like the peace-fulness of it, the calmness of the pieces as well,” Sinclair says. Sometimes it’s about the brush-stroke, the warmth of skin tones amid water colors that draws Sinclair to Severe back pain left Dianne on the sidelines. Thanks to NHRMC Spine Center, she’s now back in action. Suffering from severe scoliosis and two collapsed discs, Dianne Charter was unable to play tennis, walk on the beach, or work in her garden. Now fully recovered, she’s as active as ever, and extremely thankful that her doctor and NHRMC had the expertise and minimally invasive technology that made it possible. It’s a huge advantage for spine patients in our region. Interested in hearing Dianne’s story and learning about minimally invasive spine treatment options? Visit nhrmc.org/spine-center. 115183 nhrmc spine testimonial ad-wbm.indd 1 6/29/15 3:07 PM


2015-08
To see the actual publication please follow the link above