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minimally invasive robotic Spine Surgery 58 WBM november 2015 IN THE TRADITION of great ship portraits is Jerry Miller’s Elizabeth II. Part of celebra-tions for America’s 400th anniversary, Elizabeth II was constructed in 1984 to commemorate the original vessels that car-ried the first English colonists to America. Built and berthed in Manteo, North Carolina, the ship remains a popular attraction today. In this painting Miller depicts the square-rigged ship as it would have appeared in the 16th century: navigating the Atlantic Ocean toward Roanoke Island. Flashes of pale golden sunlight break at the horizon over the calm waters. The balanced com-position emphasizes halcyon impressions, belying Roanoke’s ill-fated Lost Colony. With a bright dawn, Miller focuses on the promise of opportunity Elizabeth II embodies. The art-ist currently resides in Cary, North Carolina. A former architect, Miller left his practice in the early 1970s and pursued a career as a full-time artist. Miller parlays his architectural background into creating detailed render-ings of historically significant landmarks Pthroughout his home state of North Carolina. AUL HEE died in 2011, leav-ing behind an outstanding legacy of maritime scenes. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and enjoying a successful career as a cruise ship executive, Hee trans-lated his lifelong love of the sea into paint and canvas. Following his retirement, Hee moved to Beaufort, North Carolina, and devoted himself to painting. The artist carefully applied European style and technique to American maritime scenes. Inspired by Beaufort’s rich nautical history, Hee painted the Confederate States Steamer Nashville. The Nashville returned to Beaufort in the winter of 1862 after successfully raiding Union commerce vessels across the Atlantic. Hee painted CSS Nashville in a triumphant scene. Dark smoke billows from the ship’s funnel, leading the eye to a dark vermillion conflagration. The blazing remnants of Harvey Birch, the first ship to fall victim to the Nashville’s attacks, is left at the horizon. The Nashville sails victoriously ahead, cutting through the teal waters. Severe back pain left Dianne on the sidelines. Thanks to NHRMC Spine Center, she’s now back in action. Suffering from severe scoliosis and two collapsed discs, Dianne Charter was unable to play tennis, walk on the beach, or work in her garden. Now fully recovered, she’s as active as ever, and extremely thankful that her doctor and NHRMC had the expertise and minimally invasive technology that made it possible. It’s a huge advantage for spine patients in our region. Interested in hearing Dianne’s story and learning about minimally invasive spine treatment options? Visit nhrmc.org/spine-center. 115183 nhrmc spine testimonial ad-wbm.indd 1 6/29/15 3:07 PM


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