A Little Piece of England

2015-11

Tucked away on a sparsely trav-eled road in the small Outer Banks town of Ocracoke lies a small plot of land that is forever England. It is the resting place for four British sailors, killed when their ship was sunk defending the North Carolina coast from the threat of German U-boats during World War II. This is hallowed ground, and there is a sense of reverence. A house stands adjacent to the cemetery. Across a small field not much wider than the space between the wickets on a cricket pitch sits an RV park. But it’s quiet here. The ever-present Outer Banks wind has the American flag crisply flapping in the RV park, but it barely ripples the British naval banner. It is a late summer day. Even though chil-dren are back in school and tourist season is over, many of the hotels on Ocracoke Island are full. The shops and restaurants along the town’s main street are doing brisk business. The lighthouse attracts a steady stream of visitors. Fewer people make the trek down British Cemetery Road, but those who do realize they are seeing a part of history that deserves to be remembered. Among them are Philip and Judith Biggs, tourists from Warwick, England. This is their second trip to Ocracoke, and to the graveyard. “It is nice to come here and see the guys and Story and Photography by Simon Gonzalez If I should die think only this of me; That there’s some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. — Ru p e r t Brook e , “The Soldi e r ” 54 WBM november 2015


2015-11
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