Page 33

2015-11

REPRODUCING history Mary Farrell, founder of Westmoore Pottery, sees herself as an educator. As guests admire her work, she informs them which patterns came from various counties throughout North Carolina. “This zigzag pattern is from the Catawba County area,” she says. “A lot of Randolf County potters used this blackish zigzag. The Winston–Salem potters used more floral patterns, and from Alamance County you will see more geometric design. Every area had their techniques, some with little differences. It is inter-esting that 20th-century potters decorate on one side, their work is more of a showpiece; whereas older pottery design might be all over or appear opposite the handle for visual balance.” Farrell also likes to debunk the myth that all centuries-old American pottery was plain and functional only. “A lot of it was decorative as well,” she says. Farrell’s niche is period reproductions. She has outfitted three kitchens in Colonial Williamsburg and other museums, and has work displayed in more than 100 cities throughout the country. She was also com-missioned to make pottery for the movies “Amistad” and “The Patriot.” She has learned which trade patterns were sold to coastal regions for her rep-lica work. Above: David and Mary Farrell built much of Westmoore Pottery’s current location on their own in 1986. Top: Mary works on the wheel in her studio. Left: A large fireplace adds to the inviting atmosphere of the showroom. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com 33 WBM


2015-11
To see the actual publication please follow the link above