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Sgt. Christopher Greenleaf is medically retired, but returns to Camp Lejeune to work with Sgt. Richard Ung and other active Marines on the art. North Carolina Congressman David Rouzer (second from right) visited the Wounded Warrior Battalion-East in August to view the painting honoring the six Marines killed in a helicopter crash during earthquake relief efforts in Nepal in May 2015. Craig Bone, above left, Sgt. Christopher Greenleaf (ret.), Staff Sgt. Adel Abudayeh (ret.) and Sgt. Richard Ung were among the artists who worked on the mural. “It’s something that Craig brought out of me,” Ung says. “He said I’m a better outliner than he is.” The WWB-E Marines not only paint, they also participate in reenactments. Bone uses tactical vehicles, equipment and uniformed troops as models. After cleaning off the makeup and dropping the weapons, the Marines take up brushes. They create large murals depicting combat scenes such as battles in Fallujah, Iraq, and also tragedies like the helicopter accident that claimed the lives of six Marines who were delivering humanitarian aid to victims of the catastrophic earthquake in Nepal. The originals are donated and sold during fundraisers for charities that support either the Marine Corps or surviving family members of those killed in action. Reliving the horrors of combat and painting for a good cause is proving cathartic for the Marine artists. “They are recording history and giving back to their country,” Bone says. “They are feeling useful again, which is the main thing.” trending 14 WBM november 2015 RELIVING THE HORRORS OF COMBAT AND PAINTING FOR A GOOD CAUSE IS PROVING CATHARTIC FOR THE MARINE ARTISTS. PHOTO BY CRAIG STEPHENS PHOTO BY ALLISON POTTER


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