Art Therapy

2015-11

PEOPLE | CULTURE | HAPPENINGS trending Marines find healing through painting Art Therapy He moved to the U.S. and settled in Fayetteville near Fort Bragg, where two of his sons-in-law were stationed. In 2010, Bone began giving art instruction to soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan as a form of therapy. He then moved to Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina, where he now works at the Wounded Warrior Battalion-East, the unit created to provide care for wounded, ill and injured Marines and sailors attached to Marine units, to maximize their recovery and prepare them for return to duty or transition to civilian life. Like Bone, Sgt. Richard Ung’s life took a dramatic, tragic turn when he was wounded in combat. Ung was serving in Iraq in 2011 with the U.S. Marine Corps when he was critically injured in an IED explosion. He sustained a Traumatic Brain Injury, and a broken thumb that still isn’t completely healed. He could no longer fight, and was reassigned from his combat unit to the WWB-E. He had never painted, but was encouraged to try. Under Bone’s tutelage, Ung became one of the artists creating realistic portraits of Marines in action. PHOTO BY CRAIG STEPHENS 13 By SIMON GONZALEZ Craig Bone was serving with the Rhodesian Light Infantry, fighting in a civil war in modern Zimbabwe in the late 1970s, when he was severely injured by a mortar attack. Everything changed in that instant. He couldn’t fight anymore. Or compete on sports fields. “I was in the military and I got blown up in the civil war in Rhodesia,” he says. “I was quite physical. I used to play rugby, athletics, things like that. When I got wounded I realized that physical side of life was over.” As depression began to set in, Bone turned to art for healing. He had studied graphic design in South Africa, and started to hone his abilities by painting combat scenes while he served. When his injuries prevented him from soldiering, he threw all of his energy into his art. He became a success at painting African wildlife. His work is exhibited in the Harte International Galleries in Hawaii, alongside the likes of Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, and Marc Chagall. But he found himself increasingly drawn to military art. Artist Craig Bone used photographs from a reenactment to work on “Raider 7,” a painting created to honor seven Marines from the Special Operations Command (MARSOC) who were killed in a helicopter crash off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, in March 2015. www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


2015-11
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