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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BYNUM/WESTERLY, RI 43 because, “more than 58,000 Americans were killed in Vietnam,” he says. “I wish I’d had Hearts Apart back then to help the Vietnam Vets, they were treated terribly when they came back home.” While the proposition of going to war was raising Harris’s consciousness, images coming back from Vietnam were raising the consciousness of America as a whole. But the photos Harris creates with Hearts Apart turn the war photography genre around. Instead of bringing the war home, they capture a moment at home with loved ones to keep the warrior solid and grounded while away. After eight hours of the shoot, Brownie Harris and the Hearts Apart crew have sent out for dinner. Little did Harris know the shoot would go on for another two hours. His friend brought back the broom with the bristles painted red and blue, and the handle blue, leaving the base white. The wife put on the white apron over a red dress with pearls. Next to her stood her soldier in cammo gear, with face painted, a helmet under his arm and a rifle on his back. She held the broom upside down and suddenly, it looked like a pitchfork. “Then in an instant it happened,” Harris says. He snapped the photo, and in his viewfinder was a new version of Grant Wood’s painting, “American Gothic.” Only in this one, the woman holds the symbolic pitchfork, standing strong, while her hus-band serves his country, with a photo in his pocket to remind him of why all this is worth it. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BYNUM/WESTERLY, RI www.wrightsvillebeachmagazine.com WBM


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