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The Big Chief’s “Tree of Life” apron detail from season three features the intricate beadwork associated with the Mardi Gras Indian ceremonial suit tradition. Alonzo V. Wilson designed this panel that illustrates the seasons of the year. The detail is focused on the transition between fall and winter. Fall symbols include the courageous lion surrounded by leaf-like emblems. Winter is represented by a key to the gates of heaven, hanging on the edge of bare tree branches. In the snow, tender blades of grass represent spring and a new cycle of life. 34 WBM july 2013 PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF AARON HINES PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF AARON HINES PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALLISON POTTER “Now we actually have a connection from the industry to the art world. Which I hope will help people see that what we all do in film — whether you’re the electrician or the driver or the craft service — we’re all part of this huge art form. That is something that’s important because I have been reluctant to call myself an artist until this exhibit. I’m a costume designer. Yes you can consider it an art, but when you say what artists really do — they actually paint or they do something and it ends up in a museum — this doesn’t always happen in costume. It’s rare. I think it is art. Everybody in the film busi-ness, they’re artists — they’re lighting artists, they’re set dressing, set decorators, set designers — everybody is an artist. This is the end of my career here. That’s the plan,” he says. Wilson says he’s no longer going to be a costume designer, he wants to produce a few films and a series he has written. “The thing about trying to end something, you’re driving along and it takes so many feet to stop if you’re going 55 miles per hour. I think now at the end of ‘Treme’ I’m going like 100 miles per hour and I want to stop doing costumes but the braking distance takes a little while so in between that time I may get a call and I may do some-thing,” he says. To create his series in Wilmington, all Wilson needs is somebody to buy it. “I would so push for it to be in Wilmington,” he says. “There’s no reason it couldn’t be filmed in Wilmington.” As for his concept, he was hush-hush. “It’s been a very guarded idea for the last seven years,” he says. Obviously he’s told some people about it. “If they mention it they’re no longer with us,” he laughs. “Let me just say this, for entertainment purposes: They’re all kinds of ele-ments that are in a series. But the bottom line here is that we are going to touch on different things in people’s lives, like mental illness, autism, things like that are part of the story, so we’re trying to make it important on so many different levels that shows don’t actually do.” PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALLISON POTTER In late July, Alonzo V. Wilson will be at Cameron Art Museum conducting a private beading workshop for 20-25 students thanks to support from First Federal in alignment with his current exhibition “Well Suited The Costumes of Alonzo V. Wilson for HBO’s “Treme.”


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