BeachBights

2013-7

beachbights PEOPLE | CULTURE | HAPPENINGS | TRENDS The Yarest Pea-Quod by MARIMAR McNAUGHTON photography by ALLISON POTTER dory – a small, shallow-draft boat, about 16 to 23 feet long with high sides, a flat bottom and sharp bows. For centuries, dories have been used as traditional fishing boats, both in coastal waters and in the open sea. Used for lobstering, clamming and hand line fishing, the Pea Pod, a double-ended lapstrake convertible rowing canoe and sailboat, caught Bryan Humphrey’s eye while visiting a friend in Rockland, Massachusetts in the 1990s. “It was the perfect design; it was like an egg,” Humphrey says. “You couldn’t add anything to it; you couldn’t take anything away from it. When you’re rowing it, you can row forward or you can turn around and row the other way without chang-ing your seat, you can push row. It’s just so boaty.” Dusting off some back issues of WoodenBoat magazine, Humphrey found the pattern for the Pea Pod named the Beach Pea by its designer and with it the instructions for building his own Pea Pod three years ago. Under the attached shed behind his Pine Street boatbuilding shop are the plywood templates he cut to mold the Pea-Quod. With Joe Hammett, a cabinet maker with whom Humphrey — an architect and general contractor — has worked side by side, and Al Winters for whom Humphrey designed and built a home on Whiskey Creek, the trio completed the boat during the winter of 2011. They bought enough plywood to build three Beach Peas. The second is almost complete. “It wouldn’t have been as much fun without Al Winters and Joe Hammett, who are soon to have boats of their own,” Humphrey says. With 40 years of woodworking skills under his belt, Humphrey circumnavigated the design more than once, altering the centerboard to a dagger board and the gaff rig to a spritsail. “It’s a little bit different than some of the other boats I’ve built,” Humphrey says. His fleet includes wooden surfboards, a wooden kayak, an Optimist sailing dinghy, a Simmons Sea Skiff currently under restoration and an Emerson Willard Crown Point Dory in maintenance. Humphrey keeps the Pea-Quod at the Carolina Yacht Club in Wrightsville Beach where he uses a wooden dolly for easing the dory into the water. He carries the oars, also made of fir. All of the boat’s pieces fit snugly inside the hull. “It was really fun to figure out how to make it sail well,” he says. “We added a curved boom to it so it held the sail shape better.” Bryan Humphrey rows the Pea-Quod in Banks Channel. 14 july 2013 WBM


2013-7
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